Baby toy safety tips every parent must know

baby eating plastic toyAlthough to safety may seem like common sense. It is far from it unless you take into consideration all the little things that your little goober’s hands can grab onto and the stuff in their mouth. Missing even a small detail can compromise your child’s safety which is the last thing you need especially if your toddler is old enough to play independently. To help you keep your little one safe; here are the top ten baby top safety tips to always keep in mind:

Pay very close attention to the age recommendations

age appropriate toysManufacturers specifically design toys for a child of a particular age. A lot of factors are taken into considerations including the parts used to make the toys. For instance, toys with small parts are not recommended for very young children who have a tendency of swallowing everything. In addition to the age recommendations, also pay keen attention to the safety labels like ‘flame resistant’.

Get rid the packaging immediately

Most toys are packaged in plastic wraps or in boxes. Both of these packaging materials are not safe for kids. This is because while plastic poses the risk of suffocation for kids, when it comes to boxes they may swallow which is not good for a child’s delicate digestive system.

In addition to the age recommendations, also pay KEEN attention to the safety labels like ‘flame resistant’

Kids under the age of one need toys with large parts

big toys small kidsAside from choosing visually appealing toys (colorful and heavily patterned), it is best to select toys that are lightweight and are also made from materials that are not toxic. Keep in mind that children under the age of one learn through touch, taste and sound. This includes putting things in their mouth so toys with large parts are best. Some small parts to avoid include removable noses and eyes in dolls and stuffed animals. These small parts are a choking hazard that often ends in parents going to the ER

Closely inspect the toys before purchasing

inspect toys closely

While there is no problem with buying toys online, it is better to purchase them physically from a store. This is because you know your child best and can look out for risky features such as sharp edges and pointed ends that can harm your little one. A common overlooked unsafe feature is stuffed animals with wires that can cut or stab your little goober when exposed. It is also advisable to stay clear of any toys that have cords, ribbons and strings of any kind because it is easy for your little one to become entangled leading to injury and in serious cases even death.

you know your child best and can look out for risky features such as sharp edges and pointed ends that can harm your little one

Teach older siblings to store their toys

storage for toys

While the older kids can safely play with toys that have sharp edges and small removable parts, these can be unsafe for their younger siblings. The best way to ensure you keep the younger kids safe is by teaching the older ones how to safely store their toys. This may entail buying storage boxes that are difficult to open for the younger kids. Keeping these toys out of the reach of younger kids is important because such kids are extremely curious and tend to investigate the toys that are inappropriate for them.

Keep toys in good condition

The best way to keep your kid safe is to ensure all the toys in their possession are kept in great condition. When they are broken they typically have sharp edges that can be unsafe for kids. This means keeping all play and toy equipment in excellent condition. At this age supervision is important to ensure the play environment is hazard free. Also teach your kids how to put toys away when they are done playing, this will help prevent accidental slips and falls.

 supervision is important to ensure the play environment is hazard free

Conclusion

Toys are great developmental and fun tools for kids of all ages. The best way to ensure they are not harmful is by taking all the safety precautions. Every little thing counts…